Mtv dating relaity show

Though the series doesn’t eschew boozed-up romantic drama, it never plays its participants’ sexual orientations as the source of spectacle.

They’re people who are messy and queer—not messy ’s own network, MTV, a surge of programming that depicted non-celebrities interacting sloppily with one another shifted the television landscape.

Each of the 16 cast members in its eighth season is, in the show’s preferred parlance, “sexually fluid.” There are eight pairs of perfect matches, but the contestants (and viewers) cannot assume they’ll fall along heteronormative lines.

In a highlight clip that finds the cast explaining why their season—and representation of queer people on television—is so important, one member offered a straightforward assessment: “If you have a reality TV show that includes the entire spectrum of, like, racial, sexual, and gender identities, you’re gonna have a really interesting show!

“This show’s the perfect experience because it’s really gonna help me figure out ” she mused in one of the intro sequences.

had been standard, unscripted fare: entertaining but vacuous.Indeed, the show was later mired in controversy following reports that Tila isn’t actually bisexual (and she has since gone on to court attention from neo-Nazis), but it ran for two seasons and inspired a spin-off.Now, nearly 12 years after the premiere of takes a wildly different approach to depicting queer, and particularly bi/pansexual, attraction.The new season of premiered right at the tail end of June—Pride Month.Like the hyper-branded festivities it coincided with, the show is a fascinating tonal mashup: The episodes that have aired thus far weave lessons about sexuality and gender (and the politics of dating while queer) into every element of the show.

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