Advice dating jewish men

But as the relationships deteriorated, she says the fact that she wasn’t Jewish came to bother the men, and it repeatedly came up in conversations over time — along with other issues such as “money, careers and plans for the future.” After leaving her, both men wound up “settling down with a nice Jewish girl.” “I guess dating me had been their last act of defiance against cultural or familial expectations before finding someone who warranted their parents’ approval — perhaps the equivalent of a woman dating a motorcycle-driving, leather-jacket wearing ‘bad boy’ before settling down with a banker with a 9-5 job,” Purcell wrote in the piece published last Thursday.“I now half-jokingly consider myself a Jewish man’s rebellion and guard myself against again landing in that role.” Readers railed against the essay for its perceived stereotyping, and mocked it in various outlets and social media.Even her unfortunate use of Jewish stereotypes feels like it comes from a place of ignorance, not malice.There’s real anti-Semitism out there, and labeling everything as such only serves to devalue the word. It is also quite possible that Purcell hit on an uncomfortable truth the Jewish community may not be excited to discuss.

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She calls them “lackadaisical” Jews who only celebrated the big holidays each year.

First and foremost, Purcell’s piece may be fundamentally misguided, but it is not anti-Semitic.

Just because a take is controversial and challenging does not make it inherently hateful.

Take, for example, the overwhelmingly negative reaction to Carey Purcell’s volcanically hot “ Purcell attempted to explain why she believed two failed relationships between her (a non-Jewish woman) and Jewish men ended partially because of religion, and why she was left feeling like “their last act of defiance against cultural or familial expectations before finding someone who warranted their parents’ approval.” The article is no doubt problematic.

The headline is pure clickbait, Purcell undercuts her own argument through statistics that show the frequency of interfaith marriages, and she plays far too fast and loose with Jewish stereotypes, with a particularly cringe-worthy bacon joke in the article’s conclusion.

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